Last edited by Akijas
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

1 edition of The saffron crocus history & cookery found in the catalog.

The saffron crocus history & cookery

Saffron Walden Museum

The saffron crocus history & cookery

by Saffron Walden Museum

  • 124 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Saffron Walden Museum in Saffron Walden Essex .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Cover title.

Other titlesSaffron crocus history and cookery
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSB317.S2 S23 2003
The Physical Object
Pagination1v. (unpaged) :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24530722M
ISBN 100905933314
LC Control Number2006389924

2. Saffron and Religions 3. Saffron in the Ancient History of Iran. Section Two: Saffron Production 4. Evolution, Botanical and Agricultural Characteristics of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and Related Species 5. Soil Conditions for Sustainable Saffron Production 6. Water Requirement of Saffron 7. Saffron Seeds- The Corm 8. Crocus sativus The spice saffron is obtained from the stamens of Crocus sativus, a fall-blooming species. The hay saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is a sterile triploid plant, known in human culture only, with no fertile seeds produced. The origin of saffron is still a mist, however it is assumed to be an autopoliploid mutant or a hybrid.

I bought 15 saffron crocus bulbs that were on sale for $, so that one-time expense of $ will give me saffron threads every year for as long as the crocus keep on blooming. And since the flowers will gradually spread and multiply, too, the amount of saffron threads I .   These strands are delicate and silky soft to the touch. These are actually the stigmas from the flower Crocus sativus Linnaeus (also known as the saffron crocus, the saffron rose, or autumn crocus). You only get three strands of saffron from each crocus flower. Because of this, it usually ta to 75, flowers to make one pound of saffron.

Books on Saffron and Crocus sativus - Spécialiste du Safran Books on Saffron, Books on Crocus sativus, Saffron Recipe, Saffron cultivation. Spécialiste du Safran 5 ks. CROCUS, SaffronFirst described in the mids, this is the crocus from which saffron, the world’s most expensive herb, is harvested. Pinkish-lavender blooms are larger than the wild saffron crocus.


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The saffron crocus history & cookery by Saffron Walden Museum Download PDF EPUB FB2

Human cultivation and use of saffron spans more than 3, years and extends across cultures, continents, and n, a spice derived from the dried stigmas of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), has through history remained among the world's most costly its bitter taste, hay-like fragrance, and slight metallic notes, the apocarotenoid-rich saffron has been used.

The History of Saffron Today. Saffron spice is still widely used around the world as a fabric dye, particularly in China and India. It also has many health and well-being uses and is used in modern medicine for its anti-cancer properties and antioxidant properties. Click to read more about saffron benefits.

Info on the Saffron Crocus. The earliest indication that the East Mediterranean people were already growing saffron crocus as early as B.C. was the mention of a great king, Sargon of Akkad, a great ruler of the Akkadian empire having hailed from the city of Azupiranu, referred to in Ancient History texts as Saffron City.

The saffron plant is also a sterile triploid, meaning saffron crocuses cannot self-reproduce or grow in the wild, and thus, require a cloning process in order to continue to grow.

During the saffron harvest, the saffron crop is cultivated and the crocus flower and saffron stigma are collected from the bulbs, also known as saffron corms.

By the 14th century, the wide use of saffron for spicing and coloring food is documented in recipe books such as the “Viandier de Taillevent”, written by the King’s cook. And by the 15th century, local saffron farming is attested with taxes levied by the religious power, which reveal how important saffron crops must have been.

Botany, Taxonomy and Cytology of Crocus sativus L. and its Allies 3. Reproduction Biology of Saffron and its Allies 4. Saffron Chemistry The Present State of Saffron Cultivation and Technology 5. Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) in Italy 6.

Saffron Cultivation in Azerbaijan 7. Saffron Cultivation in Greece 8. Saffron Cultivation in Morocco 9. Saffron in nature. Plants. Saffron spice is derived from the flowers of the plant named Crocus sativus (saffron crocus).; Birds.

The saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola) is a tanager from South America, and is common in both open and semi-open areas in lowlands outside the Amazon basin.; History and politics. The National Flag of India is officially described in the Flag Code of India as follows.

Saffron is the stigma (the female organ) of an autumn flowering crocus (Crocus sativus).The stamen is the male organ that holds pollen, and it has no use in cooking. Saffron is the world’s most expensive spice, with a street value on average of around A$20, per kilo.

A double handful of saffron weighing about 1 kilo, will contain at leaststigmas. The little red threads of saffron are the dried female parts (style and stigma filament) of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativa), a small autumn flowering plant from Eurasia.

It is primarily cultivated in Spain and Iran with smaller areas of production elsewhere, including Italy. Saffron is believed to be native to the Mediterranean, Asia Minor, and Iran, although Spain, France, and Italy are also now primary cultivators of the spice.

The spice we think of when we hear “saffron” is actually only a small part of the plant itself. Saffron (Crocus sativus) is a purple flower. Given that saffron rice is made of saffron, it is also essential to understand the history and uses of this cultivation and usage dates back more than 3, years and covers many.

Abstract. Saffron, the stigma of Crocus sativus L., has a long history for being used in food industry (flavoring and aromatic agent), in textile industries (dyes), and for therapeutic and medicinal purposes.

Medicinal uses of saffron can be attributed to the active metabolites such as crocin, crocetin, picrocrocin, and safranal present in it, which exhibit antihypertensive, anticonvulsant. Saffron in Savojbolagh County, Tehran, Iran. (Serpico/ CC BY SA ) A Touch of Gold for Food, the Body, and Books.

The uses of saffron are as varied as its origin stories. Saffron is best-known for its culinary use as a spice, and it is used in the many cuisines around the world.

History and uses. Believed native to the Mediterranean area, Asia Minor, and Iran, the saffron crocus has long been cultivated in Iran and Kashmir and is supposed to have been introduced into Cathay by the Mongol invasion.

It is mentioned in the Chinese materia medica (Pun tsaou, –78).In early times, however, the chief seat of cultivation was in Cilicia, in Asia Minor. The Essential Saffron Companion by John Humphries is the most accurate and comprehensive book ever written about the "Mellow Yellow" plant (Crocus Sativus).

It is packed with historical points about the bulb to the characteristics of the plant once bloomed. All good details and very accurate. Also, the recipes are top-notch castillian s: 4.

Ounce by ounce, saffron is one of the world’s most expensive foods, if not the most expensive food. The riotous yellow, heady spice found primarily in Mediterranean, North African, and Middle Eastern dishes can run anywhere from $5, to $10, per pound.

(By comparison, highly prized Japanese Wagyu runs only in the low $s per pound, and even the most luxurious Osetra. Saffron is a precious spice which is mainly grown in Iran, India, Spain, Greece, Italy, Pakistan, Morocco, and central Asian countries.

Until recently, saffron was perceived only for its value as a spice. However, with recent research findings pointing to the medicinal properties of saffron such as its antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic and antioxidant effects, interest in this plant has increased.3/5(2).

Persian Saffron Threads from Afghanistan by Slofoodgroup, Premium Quality Saffron Threads, All Red Saffron for cooking, tea, Grade 1 (1 Gram) out of 5 stars $ $ 8.

99 ($/Ounce). Saffron is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the “saffron crocus.”. The domesticated saffron crocus, Crocus sativus, is an autumn-flowering perennial plant unknown in the wild. It probably descends from the eastern Mediterranean autumn-flowering Crocus cartwrightianus, which is also known as “wild saffron” and originated in Crete or mainland Greece.

Saffron Crocus (Crocus sativus) brightens up fall with soft lilac-violet flowers. Find a sunny, well-drained spot and plant them in a group as soon as you receive them in late August or September.

If there is danger of frost in your area, plant in containers that can be brought indoors. They will return the favor by sprouting quickly and showing off their pretty flowers. Inside the. Saffron is as old as time.

Cleopatra was said to bathe in saffron-infused mare’s milk before seeing a suitor. “Saffron was used to dye the woolen bolero jackets worn by Minoan women; also in.The Saffron Crocus is steeped in rich history that provides a lush canvas for this tale of music, murder, and romance.

This YA novel is set in Venice with a skillful weaving of plot and period by Ms. McMahan who incorporates the social norms and prejudices of the time into a solid story that hums along at a steady pace/5(15).The numbers that figure in saffron production are startling.

It takes ab crocus flowers to produce 5 lb/ kg of stigmas, the three dark red ends of the tube (“style”) that carries pollen down to the plant’s ovary.

These 5 pounds in turn dry down to about 1 lb/ gm of saffron.